A recording of the March CVU mini is now available

Thank you to all who attended our recent CVU miniseries event COVID-19 vaccines: Engagement, Communication and Safety on 9th March 2021.

Presentation topics included COVID-19 vaccine stakeholder engagement and participation, vaccine communication and hesitancy, and an update on the Victorian Specialist Immunisation Service (VicSIS) and international vaccine safety.

A free recording of this event is now available via our education portal.

To access this recording please follow the link below:

CVU mini - 9th March 2021


Save the date for our April CVU mini event: Monday 12 April 2021

MVEC invites you to Save the Date for our next CVU mini!

Date: Monday 12 April, 2021
Time: 7:00pm - 8:30pm AEST

Further details and registration information will be available soon on our Events page and Education Portal.

To keep up to date with our latest news, including upcoming events, you can subscribe to our weekly newsletter.


Incidents after vaccination with AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine

Following reports of 2 temporally associated severe adverse events following immunisation (AEFI), the Austrian Federal Office for Safety in Health Care (the national regulatory body for medicines) have halted the supply and distribution of a specific batch of COVID-19 AstraZeneca.

It is important to note that data from clinical trials shows no evidence of a casual relationship and this halt is being utilised as a precautionary measure only. An immediate review of international reports of similar AEFI show no signals for concern. Vaccine rollout using alternate batches of COVID-19 AstraZeneca continues and further investigations are ongoing.

 To read the official announcement follow the link below:

Austrian Federal Office for Safety in Health Care: Incidents after vaccination with AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine


Learning from Errors with the New COVID-19 Vaccines

In December 2020 COVID-19 vaccination commenced across the US. This article published by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices, discusses various reports of administration and preparation errors that have occurred since the rollout began.

Given the scope of the global COVID-19 vaccination campaign, it is expected that there will be mistakes made. As Australia begins its national rollout, a key learning is ensuring that all COVID-19 vaccine errors and adverse reactions are reported to the relevant authorities to help prevent these types of errors occurring here.

To read more follow the link below:

ISMP: Learning from Errors with the New COVID-19 Vaccines


CVU mini event 9th March 2021 - Registrations closing soon

Our next Clinical Vaccinology Update (CVU) mini event: COVID-19 vaccines: engagement, communication and safety, will be held virtually on Tuesday 9th March, 2021 at 7pm AEST.

To view the full program and to register for this FREE event, please visit our Event page.

A recording of COVID-19 vaccines: engagement, communication and safety will be available on our Education Portal following the event.


The University of Melbourne: Learning as we go during vaccine rollout

As Australia begins its COVID-19 vaccine rollout, preventing disease transmission and achieving herd immunity are the long-term goals. This will only become known once the vaccine has been administered in a larger population.

The following article explores our experiences with past immunisation programs and highlights the idea of modifying schedules as further information comes to light. It is recommended that in the context of COVID-19 vaccines and a global pandemic, we must use the vaccines that are available now, and then adapt the program later.

It is suggested that with Australia's current rate of disease burden, further consideration needs to be given to developing countries to ensure a vaccine is readily available and affordable for all.

To read more follow the link below:

The University of Melbourne: Learning as we go during vaccine rollout


The Conversation: When vaccinating 26 million Australians, expect a mistake or two. But we can minimise the risk of repeating Queensland's overdose incident

Following the inadvertent administration of a higher than recommended dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to two aged-care residents, the following article discusses how this incident could happen and how we can aim to minimise the risk of it happening again.

Looking at data collected from clinical trials it is reassuring that this mistake is unlikely to have serious side effects. Moving forward it is suggested that supporting the education of immunisation providers, as well as enhancing the way we capture errors, will promote confidence in a COVID-19 vaccine rollout.

To read the article in full follow the link below:

The Conversation: When vaccinating 26 million Australians, expect a mistake or two. But we can minimise the risk of repeating Queensland’s overdose incident