These COVID-19 vaccine FAQs have been designed to address common queries relating to COVID-19 vaccine administration, allergies, safety and women’s health.

Please also see our other COVID-19 FAQs for more information on other COVID-19 related topics:

For ease of reference, information has been categorised as per the below themes:

This page will be updated on a regular basis as further information becomes available regarding COVID-19 vaccines.

For questions that have not been addressed on this page or our dedicated COVID-19 resource page, please email info.mvec@mcri.edu.au for further clarification.

Administration

  • Can COVID-19 vaccines be co-administered with other vaccines?

    The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) recommends a minimum interval of 7 days between administration of a COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines.

    Shorter interval (eg. less than 7 days or co-administration on the same day) are acceptable in the following instances:

    • An increased risk of COVID-19 or another vaccine preventable disease (eg. COVID-19 outbreak, influenza outbreak, a tetanus-prone wound)
    • Logistical issues such as difficulty scheduling visits to maintain the 7 day interval

    For more information please refer to COVID-19 vaccination- ATAGI clinical guidance on COVID-19 vaccine in Australia in 2021.

  • Can COVID-19 vaccines be used interchangeably (eg. using a different vaccine brand for the first and second dose)?

    Combined or mixed COVID-19 vaccine schedules are currently not recommended in Australia. More information relating to safety and efficacy, as well as information on appropriate intervals between doses is required, with clinical trials currently underway.

    For more information please refer to MVEC: COVID-19 mixed vaccine schedules or COVID-19 vaccination- ATAGI clinical guidance on COVID-19 vaccine in Australia in 2021.

  • Can the COVID-19 vaccine be given to people who have previously or currently have COVID-19 disease (or evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection)?

    Yes, people with previous COVID-19 disease should still be vaccinated to ensure ongoing protection. However, vaccination should be deferred until the person has fully recovered from the acute COVID-19 illness. Clinical trials indicate that it is safe to give COVID-19 vaccines in people with evidence of prior SARS-CoV-2 infection.

  • How many doses will be required? How long will I be protected and do I need a booster dose?

    The recommended schedule for Comirnaty™ is two doses given 21 days apart. A longer interval may be required due to epidemiological considerations, such as in an outbreak response to ensure available first doses are administered to as many people as possible. It is recommended a 2 dose course is completed within 6 weeks.

    The recommended schedule for COVID-19 AstraZeneca is two doses given 12 weeks apart (with a minimum interval of 4 weeks apart accepted in certain circumstances).

    Data regarding the length of protection following vaccination is still being gathered from phase III clinical trials. The length of protection is still unclear and hence the timing and need for a booster has not been established. Currently, no additional doses beyond the first two are recommended at this time.

  • What are the ABSOLUTE minimum and maximum intervals for each COVID-19 vaccine dose?

    Vaccination with COVID-19 AstraZeneca requires a 2-dose course, with ATAGI recommending an interval of 12 weeks between doses. In certain circumstances (eg. impending chemotherapy, amount of circulating disease etc) an absolute minimum interval of 28 days is acceptable. If the second dose is inadvertently administered with an interval of less than 28 days, repeat doses are not currently recommended. If more than 12 weeks has elapsed, the second dose should be administered as soon as possible with no need to re-start the course again. In clinical trials dose 2 was administered at a range of timepoints (4-26 weeks after the first dose) with the greatest efficacy induced when dose 2 was administered 12 weeks after the first dose.

    Vaccination with Comirnaty™ requires a 2-dose course administered 21 days apart. The absolute minimum interval is 19 days and the recommended maximum interval is 6 weeks. If the second dose is inadvertently administered with an interval of less than 19 days, repeat doses are not currently recommended. If more than 6 weeks has elapsed, the second dose should be administered as soon as possible with no need to re-start the course again. Clinical trials for Comirnaty™ assessed efficacy when doses were administered at a range of timepoints with these recommendations reflective of the best results obtained.

  • What happens if the second COVID-19 vaccine dose is given early, late or is missed?

    The recommended interval between two doses of Comirnaty™ is 21 days, with a minimum interval of 19 days and a maximum interval of 6 weeks. There is currently no recommendation for repeat doses/recommencing the course if there are variations to this advice.

    The recommended interval between two doses of COVID-19 AstraZeneca is 12 weeks, with a minimum interval of 4 weeks apart accepted in certain circumstances. There is currently no recommendation for repeat doses/recommencing the course if there are variations to this advice.

    For more information on dosing recommendations please refer to COVID-19 vaccination- ATAGI clinical guidance on COVID-19 vaccine in Australia in 2021.

  • I have returned from overseas where I have had one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine that is not available in Australia, can I complete a course of COVID-19 vaccination?

    If you have returned from overseas and have received a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine that is not available in Australia, you can receive an alternative vaccine brand in accordance with ATAGI guidance to complete the course. The recommended time interval between receiving your first and second dose is 4-12 weeks after the first dose. A longer interval will be accepted if this is not possible.

    For further information refer to COVID-19 vaccines: clinical considerations: people who have received a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine not yet available in Australia.

  • How long will it take to develop immunity once vaccinated?

    There is some evidence that one dose of Comirnaty™ will provide partial protection after 12 days however this is likely to be short lived. Generally the time required following vaccination for the body to develop immunity will depend on the vaccine; this usually takes a number of weeks. Completing both doses of the 2 dose course is recommended.

  • Are booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines required? Will the current vaccines protect against new strain variants?

    There is currently no recommendation for booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines in Australia. However, due to the limited data on duration of protection and the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 strain mutations, international advisory committees are considering the possibility that doses with updated vaccines will be required in the future.

    To read more refer to the links below:

  • I have had a recent blood transfusion; can I have a COVID-19 vaccine?

    Recommendations following blood transfusion generally apply to live-attenuated vaccines, such as MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) or varicella vaccines. There are currently no live-attenuated COVID-19 vaccines planned for use in Australia. Comirnaty™ is an mRNA vaccine and COVID-19 AstraZeneca is a non-replicating viral vector vaccine.

    For more information please refer to the CDC: COVID-19 Vaccine FAQs for Healthcare Professionals and MVEC: Live-attenuated vaccines and immunoglobulins or blood products.

  • I have had a recent live vaccine; can I have a COVID-19 vaccine?

    ATAGI currently recommends a 7 day interval between the administration of COVID-19 vaccines and any other vaccine (including live-attenuated vaccines). Please refer to COVID-19 vaccination- ATAGI clinical guidance on COVID-19 vaccine in Australia in 2021 for more information.

  • When administering a COVID-19 vaccine the syringe disconnected from the needle and I am not sure how much of the dose my patient received, what should I do?

    If the process of administering a vaccine is interrupted and most of the dose has not been given, repeat the whole dose as soon as practicable. If you have given most of the dose, you do not need to give the dose again. Please contact your safety service if there are any concerns/questions.

    To read more please refer to the Australian Immunisation Handbook: Administration of vaccines or Australian Government Department of Health: COVID-19 vaccine- clinical considerations.

  • What do I do if there was leakage of diluent when reconstituting the Pfizer (Comirnaty) vaccine?

    If you have injected most of the diluent into the vial and there has been no breach in infection control, the vaccine can still be used. If there is uncertainty as to how much diluent was lost, you may still use the vaccine provided you are able to draw up at least 4 doses.

    To read more please refer to the Australian Government Department of Health: COVID-19 vaccine- clinical considerations.

  • Can COVID-19 vaccines be given subcutaneously?

    Both COVID-19 AstraZeneca and Comirnaty™ should be administered via intramuscular injection. There is no safety or efficacy data relating to subcutaneous administration.

  • My patient has a history of a bleeding disorder, what is the recommendation regarding intramuscular administration of COVID-19 vaccines?

    People who are taking anticoagulant therapy or have a history of a bleeding disorder are at higher risk of haematoma formation following intramuscular injection. Prior to vaccine administration, patients should be advised of this risk.

    The correct needle size and length should be used and firm pressure should be applied to the site (no rubbing) for at least 2 minutes following immunisation.

    Subcutaneous administration is not recommended due to a lack of safety and efficacy data regarding this route of administration.

    For further information please refer to the Australian Immunisation Handbook.

  • Can women with a history of breast cancer receive COVID-19 vaccines?

    Yes. Having a history of breast cancer is not a contraindication for COVID-19 vaccination.

    ATAGI recommends COVID-19 vaccination for all immunosuppressed people (including those undergoing treatment for cancers) due to an increased risk of developing severe disease if infected with SARS-CoV-2. It is anticipated that the immune response to vaccination may be reduced in this patient group depending on the level of immune suppression.

    Lymphadenopathy has been reported as a side effect following vaccination. Given that changes in size and consistency of lymph nodes can also indicate a spread of breast cancer, the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) has recommended breast screening take place either prior to COVID-19 vaccination or 4-6 weeks following the second dose of COVID-19 vaccines to avoid anxiety and unnecessary examination and diagnostic testing.

    To read more refer to the links below:

  • What is the recommended site for injection for patients who have had axillary lymph nodes removed/have a history of lymphoedema?

    There is no strong evidence to suggest that vaccine administration into the deltoid will increase the likelihood of lymphoedema in patients who have had lymph nodes removed or have a previous history of lymphoedema.

    Vaccine administration into the deltoid of the unaffected arm may be preferred, alternatively intramuscular injection into the vastus lateralis (thigh) can be considered.

    To read more refer to the links below:

  • My patient has a history of Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS), is it safe to administer COVID-19 vaccines?

    Individuals who have previously been diagnosed with GBS can receive COVID-19 vaccines. Specialist advice from a treating neurologist or immunisation specialist may be considered to discuss the benefits and risks of vaccination.

    For more information please refer to MVEC: Guillain-Barre Syndrome page and CDC: Vaccine Considerations for People with Underlying Medical Conditions.

  • Are there any concerns regarding COVID-19 vaccines and Bell’s Palsy?

    People who have previously been diagnosed with Bell’s Palsy can receive COVID-19 vaccines. Cases of Bell’s Palsy following immunisation have been identified in participants in mRNA COVID-19 vaccine candidate clinical trials. However, as the rate of occurrence was not above the background rate expected in the general population, they are not considered to be caused by vaccination.

    For more information refer to CDC: Vaccine Considerations for People with Underlying Medical Conditions.

  • Is it safe for people with a diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) to be immunised against COVID-19?

    Yes. Whilst there is minimal data on the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination in people with MS, there are no theoretical concerns relating to administration in this patient group.

    For more information please refer to:

  • Can patients who are taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI’s) be safely immunised with COVID-19 vaccines given that they should generally avoid adrenaline? What would be the appropriate treatment if they experienced anaphylaxis?

    Yes, COVID-19 vaccines should be offered to this patient group.

    True vaccine allergy, or anaphylaxis, is an extremely rare adverse event following immunisation occurring in less than 1 case per million doses administered. Post-licensure surveillance of COVID-19 vaccines show anaphylaxis following administration of COVID-19 AstraZeneca occurring at similar rates to routine vaccines [refer to TGA: AstraZeneca ChAdOx1-S COVID-19 vaccine]. Anaphylaxis following Comirnaty™, whilst still extremely rare, occurs at a slightly higher rate of approximately 4.7 cases per million doses.

    Patients who take MAOI’s have a theoretical increased risk of developing hypertensive crisis if administered adrenaline (or other specific medications/foods) due to a potential for drug interaction. In the setting of anaphylaxis, resuscitation with adrenaline remains the most appropriate treatment regardless of medical history. The benefits of treating anaphylaxis effectively far outweighs any potential risk of hypertensive crisis.

    Ensuring the diagnosis of anaphylaxis is accurate is an important step to avoid unnecessary administration of adrenaline when not clinically indicated.

    For more information refer to:

Safety

  • How can a COVID-19 vaccine be safe when it was made so quickly?

    COVID-19 vaccine development is happening “faster than usual” because of the global impact of the pandemic and the urgent need for a vaccine(s). Vaccines have traditionally been developed in consecutive sequential stages – with preclinical trials followed by phases I, II and III, often with large gaps of time in-between phases awaiting funding or manufacturing scaleup. With COVID-19, this process has been made more efficient by running one phase while simultaneously also preparing and/or recruiting for the next phase.

    It is important to note that COVID-19 vaccine candidates must pass through the exact same rigor and phases of clinical trials and do not miss any important safety and quality checks or steps. Approval is only given if the vaccine meets the appropriate requirements for safety and efficacy.

    Refer to MVEC: Vaccine development and safety, including “The Road to a COVID-19 Vaccine” animation for more information.

  • How can we be sure that the manufacturing process is safe?

    Like any medication in development, vaccine candidates must undergo rigorous testing procedures and scientific evaluation to prove not only their effect on the targeted disease, but also to determine their safety – before being licensed and registered for use in vaccination programs.

    In all three clinical trial phases, safety is continually assessed as data is gathered and a vaccine must pass all these phases before it can be considered for registration for use by the TGA. By the time a vaccine is registered, safety would have been assessed in tens of thousands of clinical trial participants and this safety data would have been rigorously evaluated by the TGA and other international drug regulatory bodies.

    The quality, sterility, potency and purity of each vaccine batch is also assessed by the TGA prior to being supplied to Australia, as is the quality of selected batches after they have been supplied.

    Once a vaccine is approved, it continues to be tested in a process known as post-licensure surveillance.

  • What are the expected side effects of a COVID-19 vaccine?

    You may experience minor side effects following COVID-19 vaccination. Common side effects include pain, redness and swelling at the injection site as well as more general side effects such as fever, chills, headache and tiredness.

    Most systemic (general) symptoms are mild to moderate in severity, occur within the first three days of vaccination, and resolve within 1–3 days of onset. These symptoms may be more common and severe following the second dose and among younger people compared to older people.

    Serious reactions like allergic reactions are extremely rare. If you have any concerns about the vaccine, ask your doctor, nurse or health care professional.

    For more information, please refer to the following documents:

  • Can a COVID-19 vaccine be given to those with immunosuppression?

    ATAGI recommends COVID-19 vaccination for all immunosuppressed people due to an increased risk of developing severe disease if infected with SARS-CoV-2. Due to limitations in clinical trials there is currently no data on the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination in this group, however in principle there are no theoretical risks.

    It is anticipated that the immune response to vaccination may be reduced in this patient group depending on the level of immune suppression. Hence, when vaccinating immunocompromised people, they should also be counselled about this reduced efficacy and the need to continue other prevention measures such as social distancing and mask wearing.

    Household contacts of people with immunosuppression are recommended to receive COVID-19 vaccines. This helps protect people who are immunocompromised, whether they are a child or an adult, by reducing their exposure to disease.

    Please speak to your doctor to discuss individual cases and see the following links for more information:

  • How are vaccines monitored for safety post licensure? What is the role of SAEFVIC/TGA?

    Post-licensure safety monitoring in Australia occurs using a variety of mechanisms. These may include:

    Surveillance of Adverse Events Following Vaccination In the Community (SAEFVIC) is the central reporting service in Victoria for any significant AEFI. SAEFVIC collects, analyses and reports data about significant AEFI as part of monitoring vaccine safety in Victoria. All reports are sent to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) who is responsible for assessing the safety of vaccines and other medicines for use in Australia.

    The role of the TGA is also to determine whether a COVID-19 vaccine candidate meets the strict safety and efficacy requirements for registration before it can be used in Australia.

    For more information refer to the Therapeutic Goods Administration: COVID-19 vaccines.

  • I think I am experiencing some side effects, should I report?

    Any event felt to be significant following immunisation should be reported. You do not need to routinely report common/minor/expected reactions.

    Clinicians must report severe adverse effects through SAEFVIC in Victoria. This should be done whether you think the side effect was related to the vaccine or not.

  • I experienced side effects from the first dose of the vaccine, should I not have the second dose?

    Common side effects that are short lived are not a contraindication to the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine.

    If you have experienced any unanticipated side effects following the first dose COVID-19 vaccine, speak to your healthcare professional about the safety of a second dose.

    If you had an immediate or severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) after getting the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, you should not get the second dose. Your healthcare provider may refer you an allergy specialist for further advice. Serious reactions like allergic reactions are extremely rare.

  • What is vaccine-associated enhanced disease?

    Vaccine-associated enhanced disease occurs when a more severe presentation of disease develops in an individual who has previously been immunised, compared with when an infection occurs without prior vaccination.

    For more information on VAED please review our reference page MVEC: Vaccine-associated enhanced disease

  • My patient has a history of Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS), is it safe to administer COVID-19 vaccines?

    Individuals who have previously been diagnosed with GBS can receive COVID-19 vaccines. Specialist advice from a treating neurologist or immunisation specialist may be considered to discuss the benefits and risks of vaccination.

    For more information please refer to MVEC: Guillain-Barre Syndrome page and CDC: Vaccine Considerations for People with Underlying Medical Conditions.

  • Are there any concerns regarding COVID-19 vaccines and Bell’s Palsy?

    People who have previously been diagnosed with Bell’s Palsy can receive COVID-19 vaccines. Cases of Bell’s Palsy following immunisation have been identified in participants in mRNA COVID-19 vaccine candidate clinical trials. However, as the rate of occurrence was not above the background rate expected in the general population, they are not considered to be caused by vaccination.

    For more information refer to CDC: Vaccine Considerations for People with Underlying Medical Conditions.

  • Is it safe for people with a diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) to be immunised against COVID-19?

    Yes. Whilst there is minimal data on the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccination in people with MS, there are no theoretical concerns relating to administration in this patient group.

    For more information please refer to:

  • Can patients who are taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI’s) be safely immunised with COVID-19 vaccines given that they should generally avoid adrenaline? What would be the appropriate treatment if they experienced anaphylaxis?

    Yes, COVID-19 vaccines should be offered to this patient group.

    True vaccine allergy, or anaphylaxis, is an extremely rare adverse event following immunisation occurring in less than 1 case per million doses administered. Post-licensure surveillance of COVID-19 vaccines show anaphylaxis following administration of COVID-19 AstraZeneca occurring at similar rates to routine vaccines [refer to TGA: AstraZeneca ChAdOx1-S COVID-19 vaccine]. Anaphylaxis following Comirnaty™ (Pfizer/BioNTech), whilst still extremely rare, occurs at a slightly higher rate of approximately 4.7 cases per million doses.

    Patients who take MAOI’s have a theoretical increased risk of developing hypertensive crisis if administered adrenaline (or other specific medications/foods) due to a potential for drug interaction. In the setting of anaphylaxis, resuscitation with adrenaline remains the most appropriate treatment regardless of medical history. The benefits of treating anaphylaxis effectively far outweighs any potential risk of hypertensive crisis.

    Ensuring the diagnosis of anaphylaxis is accurate is an important step to avoid unnecessary administration of adrenaline when not clinically indicated.

    For more information refer to:

  • Can patients with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) receive COVID-19 vaccines?

    Yes. The effect of COVID-19 vaccination on pre-existing ITP (acute and chronic) has not been well characterised. Limited and early data indicates that vaccination may worsen thrombocytopenia in approximately 10% of patients with chronic ITP post vaccination. However, it is important to note that ITP is most often triggered by a virus, and that the risk of relapse or worsening of ITP is likely higher if these patients contract COVID-19 than the risk following vaccination itself. Patients with a  history of ITP are therefore recommended to proceed with vaccination, however if clinical symptoms worsen post vaccination (days to weeks) then monitoring of platelets and escalation of therapy maybe required.

Allergies

  • Is it safe to administer COVID-19 vaccines to people with latex allergies?

    The COVID-19 vaccines with provisional registration for use within Australia (Comirnaty™ and COVID-19 AstraZeneca) can both be administered to people with latex allergies following standard precautions, with a 15 minute post-vaccination observation period. Neither Comirnaty™ or COVID-19 AstraZeneca vials contain latex.

    For more information please refer to the ASCIA: Allergy, Immunodeficiency, Autoimmunity and COVID-19 Vaccination Position Statement.

  • My patient has a history of allergies, is it safe to administer a COVID-19 vaccine to them?

    The only two absolute contraindications to vaccination are anaphylaxis to a previous dose of the same vaccine or anaphylaxis to a component of the vaccine. For specific advice please contact your specialist immunisation service.

    For patients with a history of anaphylaxis to food, drugs, venom or latex, it is recommended a routine observation period of 15 minutes following COVID-19 vaccination is observed.

    Additional precautions are recommended for individuals with possible allergic reactions to a previous dose of a COVID-19 vaccine; allergic reactions to ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccine to be administered (including PEG in Comirnaty™ and Polysorbate 80 in COVID-19 AstraZeneca); prior anaphylactic reactions to other vaccines or medications where PEG or Polysorbate 80 may have been the cause; or a known systemic mast cell activation disorder with raised mast cell tryptase that has required treatment.

    In these instances a specialist review by an immunology/allergy/vaccination specialist to undertake a risk/benefit assessment to assess suitability for vaccination should be undertaken.

    Pleaser refer to COVID-19 vaccination – ATAGI clinical guidance on COVID-19 Vaccine in Australia in 2021 or the ASCIA: Allergy, Immunodeficiency, Autoimmunity and COVID-19 Vaccination Position Statement for more information.

  • My patient has a history of allergy to Polyethylene Glycol (PEG), can I administer a COVID-19 vaccine to them?

    PEG is an ingredient contained in Comirnaty™. It is also a commonly used ingredient of other medications, hand sanitisers, cosmetics, bathroom products and colonoscopy preparation products, routinely used within Australia. Whilst it is uncertain whether PEG contained in mRNA vaccines may trigger anaphylaxis, additional precautions are required.

    If your patient has a history of confirmed or suspected allergy to PEG it is recommended that they are referred to an immunology/allergy/vaccination specialist for advice regarding the safety of administering an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

    NB: Vaccination with the Comirnaty™ COVID-19 vaccine is contraindicated in people with documented anaphylaxis to PEG.

    To read more refer to COVID-19 vaccination – ATAGI clinical guidance on COVID-19 Vaccine in Australia in 2021.

  • My patient has a history of allergy to Polysorbate 80, can I administer a COVID-19 vaccine to them?

    Polysorbate 80 is chemically related to Polyethylene Glycol (see question above) and is an ingredient in COVID-19 AstraZeneca.

    If your patient has a history of confirmed or suspected allergy to Polysorbate 80 it is recommended that they are referred to an immunology/allergy/vaccination specialist for advice regarding the safety of administering COVID-19 AstraZeneca.

    NB: Vaccination with the COVID-19 AstraZeneca is contraindicated in people with documented anaphylaxis to Polysorbate 80.

    For further information please refer to ASCIA: Allergy, Immunodeficiency, Autoimmunity and COVID-19 Vaccination Position Statement and COVID-19 vaccination – ATAGI clinical guidance on COVID-19 Vaccine in Australia in 2021.

  • Do COVID-19 vaccines contain gelatin?

    Both COVID-19 AstraZeneca and Comirnaty™ are gelatin free and safe to administer to patients who are allergic to gelatin. A standard 15-minute observation period following immunisation is recommended.

  • What are the ingredients of COVID-19 vaccines?

    There are currently 2 COVID-19 vaccine with provisional registration in use in Australia.

    Each dose of Comirnaty™ (Pfizer/ BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine) contains:

    • 30 mcg mRNA encoding the SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein
    • (4-hydroxybutyl)azanediyl)bis(hexane-6,1-diyl)bis(2- hexyldecanoate) (ALC-0315)
    • 2-[(polyethylene glycol)-2000]-N,N-ditetradecylacetamide (ALC0159)
    • Distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC)
    • Cholesterol
    • Potassium chloride
    • Monobasic potassium phosphate
    • Sodium chloride
    • Dibasic sodium phosphate dihydrate
    • Sucrose
    • Water for injections

    Each dose of COVID-19 AstraZeneca (Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine) contains:

    • 5×1010 viral particles of ChAdOx1-S
    • Histidine
    • Histidine hydrochloride monohydrate
    • Sodium chloride
    • Magnesium chloride hexahydrate
    • Disodium edetate (EDTA)
    • Sucrose
    • Ethanol absolute
    • Polysorbate 80
    • Water for injection

    Further information can be found in the Product Information for each vaccine:

  • Is there an increased risk of anaphylaxis following COVID-19 vaccines?

    A true vaccine allergy (anaphylaxis), where a person is contraindicated from being immunised with the same vaccine in the future, is rare (in most studies reported as less than 1 case per million doses).

    Post-licensure surveillance of COVID-19 vaccines show anaphylaxis following administration of COVID-19 AstraZeneca occurring at similar rates to routine vaccines. Anaphylaxis following Comirnaty™, while still extremely rare, occurs at a slightly higher rate of approximately 4.7 cases per million doses.

    To read more follow the links below:

Authors: Daniela Say (MVEC Immunisation Fellow), Georgina Lewis (SAEFVIC Clinical Manager, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute), Rachael McGuire (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator) and Francesca Machingaifa (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator)

Reviewed by: Rachael McGuire (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator) and Francesca Machingaifa (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator)

Date: August 2, 2021

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.