Multi-dose vials

What are they?

Multi-dose vials contain more than one dose of a medicine/vaccine in a single vial. Whilst all vaccines on the National Immunisation Program are single-use preparations, BCG vaccines and COVID-19 vaccines are available in multi-dose vials in Australia. Multi-dose vials are more economical, take less time to manufacture and require less storage space than single-use preparations, however, there is an increased risk of infection control breaches associated with their use.

Infection control principles

There is an increased risk of blood-borne viruses or bacterial contamination with the use of multi-dose vials due to an increased risk of cross contamination. These risks can be mitigated by:

  • Maintaining standard principles of infection control and strict aseptic technique when accessing multi-dose vials
  • Preparing doses of vaccines from multi-dose vials in a clean, designated medication preparation area
  • Cleaning the stopper with an alcohol swab and allowing to dry every time the vial is accessed
  • Using a new, sterile syringe and needle each time the vial is accessed. Needles should never be left inside the vial
  • Discarding a multi-dose vial if the vaccine’s integrity or sterility is compromised

Storage and usage

  • Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for refrigeration, storage, usage timeframes and expiry dates. Protect from sunlight and freezing where required.
  • Always label a multi-dose vial with the date and time of first access or reconstitution
  • The expiry date is the date after which an unused multi-dose vial should be discarded
  • The use by date is the date after which a multi-dose vial that has been accessed should no longer be used. A use by date supercedes the expiry date
  • Check reconstituted vaccines for signs of deterioration, such as a change in colour or clarity. If there are signs of deterioration, refer to the vaccine product information. Do not use the vaccine

Multi-dose vials that require reconstitution

  • Only the recommended diluent should be used to reconstitute a multi-dose vial
  • Introduce the diluent down the side of the vial to avoid foaming or potentially denaturing the vaccine. Mix gently with a careful swirling motion. Do not shake
  • Give reconstituted vaccines as soon as practicable after reconstituting. This is because reconstituted vaccines may deteriorate rapidly
  • Once accessed, label the multi-dose vial with the date and time of reconstitution

Pre-filling syringes

Pre-preparing syringes with vaccines is not recommended for several reasons:

  • The uncertainty of vaccine stability
  • The risk of contamination
  • Increased risk of potential errors in administration
  • Potential vaccine wastage

If you are in a setting where pre-preparing multiple doses is required, then only draw up the number of doses necessary to keep the immunisation session running efficiently. These doses must be labelled with the date and time the vial was accessed and should be used as soon as possible, ensuring that the cold chain is maintained.

Principles of administration

  • Attach a new, sterile, disposable injecting needle of appropriate size and length to administer the vaccine
  • Be careful not to prime the needle with any of the vaccine as this can increase the risk of injection site reactions
  • Administer the vaccine as soon as practicable after drawing it up
  • Discard multi-dose vials at the end of an Immunisation session/6 hours after accessing (whichever is sooner) or according to manufacturer’s guidelines
  • Refer to the product information to determine the specified timeframe the vaccine must be used by once the vial has been accessed

Resources

Authors: Francesca Machingaifa (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator) and Rachael McGuire (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator)

Date: February 2021

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.


Meningococcal vaccines in special risk and immunosuppressed patients

This MVEC guideline details our recommendations regarding meningococcal vaccines in those who are considered at higher risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) either due to an underlying medical condition or due to immunosuppressive medication.

  • From 1 July 2020, recommendations for meningococcal vaccines are changing to make meningococcal vaccines more readily available and give extra protection to people who are most at risk of invasive meningococcal disease.

In 2019, Meningococcal B and Meningococcal W are still the most commonly circulating sub-types of Meningococcal disease in Australia. There are vaccines available to protect against Meningococcal A, B, C, W and Y.

A single dose of Nimenrix® (MenACWY) vaccine is currently provided for free at 12-months of age and for all adolescents in Year 10 Secondary school (or age equivalent) with catch up available at 15 -19-years of age on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). People with certain medical conditions that increase the risk of IMD may also be eligible for a funded dose.

Bexsero® (MenB) vaccine is NIP funded (from the 1st July 2020) for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children < 2-years of age. The incidence of IMD is around 4 times higher in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children than non-indigenous children. The number of doses required depends on age and the presence of conditions associated with an increased risk of IMD.

MenB and MenACWY vaccines are now funded under the NIP for people of all ages with medical conditions that increase the risk of IMD. These are functional asplenia and hyposplenia (including sickle-cell disease or haemoglobinopathies), complement deficiency and those receiving treatment with eculizamab. People with these medical conditions are also eligible for NIP-funded booster doses of MenACWY vaccine as per The Australian Immunisation Handbook.

Some local councils offer Bexsero as a fee for service if patients wish to be protected but do not meet the criteria on the NIP. Alternatively, this vaccine is available at the GP on private prescription.

People with several other medical conditions that also result in an increased risk of IMD such as HIV, haemotopoietic stem cell transplant, young adults aged 20-24 who are smokers and laboratory workers who handle Neisseria meningitidis) are still recommended to receive these vaccines, however, MenACWY and MenB vaccines are not funded in this group. See ATAGI clinical advice on changes to vaccine recommendations and funding for people with risk conditions from 1 July 2020 for more information.

Bexsero® is funded under the NIP for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants < 2-years with any of the above conditions that increase the risk of IMD.

A list of common immune suppressive medications resulting in a patient being at higher risk of IMD can be found in Table 1.

We recommend administration of both vaccines from 6-weeks of age, or at the time of diagnosis/commencement of immunosuppressive therapies (see Table 2). Immunisation status should be reassessed regularly and as part of the transition to an adult facility, with booster doses to be considered every 5 years.

Local funding (RCH Melbourne)

At the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne these meningococcal vaccines have Drug Utilisation Committee (DUC) approval and funding. There is a pharmaceutical (PBS) fee for these vaccines, which is reduced if the child has a healthcare card.

Table 1: Immunosuppressive medications

Mechanism of action Examples*
Anti-TNF Etanercept Infliximab Adalimumab
IL-1 inhibition Anakinra
Costimulation blockade Abatacept
B-cell depletion/inhibition Rituximab
Immunomodulators (antimetabolites) Azathioprine  6-Mercaptopurine  Methotrexate
Corticosteroids Prednisone
T-cell activation/inhibition Tacrolimus Cyclosporine

*NB: prednisolone doses considered immunosuppressive is > 2mg/kg (or 20mg) for 2-weeks, or 1mg/kg for > 1-month

Table 2: Nimenrix® (Meningococcal ACWY)^ and Bexsero® (Meningococcal B)¥ recommendations for people with medical conditions that increase risk of IMD

Age at commencement of vaccine course Primary immunisation course Adolescent doses

6-weeks to ≤ 5-months

4 doses*# (minimum 8 weeks apart, 4th dose at 12-months of age or 8 weeks after 3rd dose, whichever is later)

Even if the primary course has been completed adolescence is a time of increased risk of IMD.

A single dose of Nimenrix® vaccine is currently provided for all adolescents in year 10 (or age equivalent) with catch up available at 15-19 years of age on the NIP.

MVEC recommend a booster dose of Bexsero® at this time point in adolescence as well.

6-months to ≤ 11-months

3 doses*# (minimum 8 weeks between dose 1 and 2, 3rd dose at 12-months of age or 8 weeks after second dose, whichever is later)

≥ 12-months

2 doses*# (minimum 8 weeks part)

*Specified medical conditions that increase the risk of IMD include complement deficiency, receiving treatment with eculizumab, asplenia, HIV, haemopoietic stem cell transplant, young people aged 20-24 who are smokers and laboratory workers who handle Neisseria meningitidis
^Note the meningococcal ACWY vaccines are not equivalent - MVEC preferentially recommends Nimenrix® brand
#Refer to MVEC: Meningococcal disease and vaccines for advice on Bexsero® and paracetamol administration
¥Meningococcal B vaccines are not equivalent or interchangeable - MVEC preferentially recommends Bexsero® brand

Resources 

Authors: Nigel Crawford (Director SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute) and Rachael McGuire (Research Nurse SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute)

Reviewed by: Georgina Lewis (Clinical Manager SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children's Research Institute), Francesca Machingaifa (Research Nurse SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children's Research Institute) and Nigel Crawford (Director SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children's Research Institute)

Date: July 2020 

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.


Meningococcal disease and vaccines

Meningococcal disease is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis. There are 13 known sub-types (serogroups) and of these, 5 are currently vaccine preventable (B and A, C, W, Y).

Serogroups B, C, W and Y account for the highest number of cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Australia. In the first 6-months of 2019, just over half (52%) of meningococcal cases reported were due to serogroup B (n=46), 28% were due to serogroup W (n=25), 15% of cases were due to serogroup Y (n=13), and 6% were due to serogroup C (n=5).

Children < 2-years of age have the highest incidence of meningococcal disease. There is another peak of disease among adolescents and young adults aged 15-24 years. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a  much greater burden of disease than non-Indigenous people.

People with meningococcal disease can become extremely unwell very quickly. IMD can cause meningitis (inflammation of the membrane covering the brain and spinal cord), septicaemia (infection in the blood) as well as other infections like pneumonia (lung infection), arthritis (inflammation of the joints) and conjunctivitis (eye infection). Mortality (death) can be as high as 5-10% and permanent lifelong complications can occur in 10-20% of those who survive. Disease is transmitted via respiratory droplets (sneezing and coughing etc).

MVEC strongly encourages the immunisation of anyone wishing to be protected against meningococcal disease.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BGYUVBwpxk&feature=youtu.be

Meningococcal ACWY

A four-in one combination vaccine is available for protection against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W and Y.

There are currently two quadrivalent conjugate vaccines (4vMenCV) recommended for immunisation against meningococcal A, C, W and Y.

  • Nimenrix® (Pfizer) – For use from 6-weeks of age
  • Menveo® (GSK) – For use from 6-weeks of age

A single dose of Nimenrix® vaccine is currently provided for free at 12-months of age and for all adolescents in Year 10 secondary school (or age equivalent) with catch up available at 15-19 years of age on the National Immunisation Program (NIP). People with certain medical conditions that increase the risk of IMD may also be eligible for a funded dose [refer to MVEC: Meningococcal vaccines in special risk and immunosuppressed patients for more information].

Some local councils have Nimenrix®  available for purchase if patients wish to be protected but do not meet the criteria on the NIP. Alternatively, this vaccine is available at the GP on private prescription.

Table 1: Recommended MenACWY vaccine schedule (by brand) for healthy individuals, travellers and laboratory personnel

Vaccine Brand¥ Course commenced at age 6-weeks to ≤ 5-months of age Course commenced at 6 to ≤ 8- months Course commenced at 9 to ≤ 11-months of age Course commenced at ≥ 12 to 23-months of age Course commenced at ≥ 2-years of age
Nimenrix® 2 doses (minimum 8 weeks apart) + 1 booster^# dose 1 dose + 1 booster^# dose 1 dose + 1 booster^# dose 1 dose# 1 dose#
Menveo® 2 doses (minimum 8 weeks apart) + 1 booster^# dose 1 dose + 1 booster^ dose 1 dose + 1 booster^ dose 2 doses (minimum 8 weeks apart) 1 dose

¥completing the course with the same vaccine brand is preferred but may not always be practical. The NIP funded 12-month dose of Nimenrix® may be used as the booster dose for those who have commenced the course < 12-months of age.
there is no registered upper age limit for use of Menveo® or Nimenrix®
^booster dose is given at ≥ 12 months of age/8 weeks since previous dose (whichever is later)
#a single dose of Nimenrix® is funded on the NIP at 12-months of age and for year 10 students and adolescents aged 15-19 years of age who missed receiving the vaccine at school

Meningococcal B

There are currently 2 vaccines (4CMenB) available for the protection of meningococcal B disease.

  • Bexsero® – For use from 6-weeks of age
  • Trumenba® – For use in ≥ 10-years of age

These vaccines can be administered at the same time as routine NIP vaccines [refer to advice below on paracetamol in infants < 4-years].

Meningococcal B vaccines brands are not interchangeable.

From July 1 2020 Bexsero® was funded on the NIP for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children < 2-years of age due to the incidence of IMD being around 4 times higher in this patient group than in non-indigenous children [refer to ATAGI clinical advice on vaccination recommendations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from 1 July 2020 and table 3 below for more information]. The number of doses required depends on age and the presence of conditions associated with an increased risk of IMD.

Some local councils have Bexsero® available for purchase if patients wish to be protected but do not meet the criteria on the NIP. Alternatively, this vaccine is available at the GP on private prescription.

Paracetamol advice

The RCH and Monash Immunisation services recommend the use of paracetamol with every dose of 4CMenB given to children < 4-years of age, to reduce the likelihood and severity of fever that may occur after immunisation with 4CMenB. The first dose of paracetamol (15 mg/kg per dose) should be given in the 30 minutes before vaccination, or as soon as possible after immunisation, even if children do not have a fever. This should be followed by 2 more doses of paracetamol given 4 to 6 hours apart.

Table 2: Recommended MenB vaccine schedule for healthy individuals, travellers, laboratory workers, young adults living in close quarters and smokers*

Vaccine Brand¥ Course commenced at age 6 weeks to ≤ 11 months Course commenced at 12 months to ≤ 9 years of age Course commenced at ≥ 10 years of age
Bexsero®# 2 doses (minimum 8 weeks apart) + 1 booster^ dose 2 doses (minimum 8 weeks apart) 2 doses (minimum 8 weeks apart)
Trumenba® N/R N/R  2 doses (6 months apart)

*Australian Immunisation Handbook recommendations
¥meningococcal B vaccines brands are not interchangeable
#paracetamol recommended to those < 4-years of age (refer to advice above)
^booster dose at ≥ 12-months of age/8 weeks since previous dose (whichever is later)
N/R- not recommended in this age group

Table 3: NIP funded Bexsero® (MenB) vaccine schedule for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) children  < 2-years

Vaccine brand ATSI children with no medical risk conditions ATSI children with risk conditions for IMD#
Bexsero® 2 doses* (minimum 8 weeks apart) + booster dose^¥ 3 doses* (minimum 8 weeks apart) + booster dose^¥

#refer to National Immunisation Program: Meningococcal vaccination schedule from 1 July 2020
*can be given from 6-weeks of age
^booster dose from ≥ 12-months of age/8 weeks since previous dose (whichever is later)
¥paracetamol recommended to those < 4-years of age (refer to advice above)

Special risk groups

Patients with certain medical conditions and those taking immunosuppressive medications are potentially at increased risk of infection with IMD.

MenB and MenACWY vaccines are now funded under the NIP for people of all ages with some specified medical conditions associated with a high risk of IMD.

Please refer to  MVEC: Meningococcal vaccines in special risk and immunosuppressed patients and ATAGI clinical advice on vaccination recommendations for people with risk conditions for specific immunisation recommendations for this patient group.

Resources

Authors: Rachael McGuire (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Nigel Crawford (Director, SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute), Georgina Lewis (Clinical Nurse Manager, SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

Reviewed by: Georgina Lewis (Clinical Manager SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute) and Francesca Machingaifa (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute)

Date: July 2020

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.


MTHFR Gene

  • A number of families and consumers and healthcare professionals have been asking MVEC staff about the MTHFR gene and possible adverse events following immunisation [AEFI]
  • MTHFR stands for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, which is the name of an enzyme involved in folate metabolism

MTHFR gene polymorphisms, or harmless changes in the gene, are very common. MTHFR gene mutations are different to gene polymorphisms and are very rare and present differently [see below Resources: MTHFR VCGS].

Research and clinical reports have shown that multiple MTHFR gene polymorphisms have been linked to thromboembolism (or blood clots), but there has been no proven, or conclusive link regarding other health conditions. This includes adverse events [AEFI] following vaccines administered on the Australian National Immunisation Program.

We have sought advice from our expert colleagues at the Victorian Clinical Genetic Services, who have provided an excellent, clearly written document regarding the indications for and usefulness of the MHFTR test [see below Resources: MTHFR VCGS].

What to do?

  • At MVEC, we believe that there is no clinical indication for MTHFR polymorphism testing before vaccination, as there is no proven increased risk of an AEFI
  • If a family member has already had the test, we do not recommend any testing of relatives and feel it is safe to proceed with all immunisations

Resources

Authors: Nigel Crawford (Director SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute) and Margie Danchin (Senior Research Fellow, Murdoch Children's Research Institute)

Date: February 2018

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.


Maternal vaccination during pregnancy

Immunisation assessment is an extremely important aspect of healthcare during pregnancy. When planning a pregnancy, talk to your health care provider about any vaccines you might need beforehand. Live-attenuated vaccines should be given at least a month before conception.

Recommended vaccines

Influenza and pertussis vaccines are the only vaccines routinely recommended for pregnant women. They are provided for free via the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

Some other vaccines can be administered in special circumstances but are not routinely recommended. This includes COVID-19 vaccines. Refer to the Australian Immunisation Handbook for further information.

Influenza

Influenza vaccination is safe and strongly recommended for pregnant women to avoid complications from influenza disease. It can be administered at any stage of pregnancy and not only aims to protect the expectant mother from disease, but also to provide passive protection to the infant.

Pregnant women are at greater risk of morbidity and mortality from influenza disease than non-pregnant women. They are more than twice as likely to be hospitalised with influenza disease as other people with influenza.

Babies less than 6-months of age are at greatest risk of disease and death from influenza and maternal vaccination will provide protection to babies for the first few months of life until they can be immunised against influenza from 6-months of age.

Pertussis

Pertussis (whooping cough) immunisation during pregnancy is a safe and effective way to protect the mother and prevent disease of the newborn. It is recommended that a single dose of the vaccine be administered between 20 and 32 weeks of pregnancy, in every pregnancy, including pregnancies that are closely spaced.

Maternal antibodies against pertussis provide protection for babies until they have at least received 2 doses of their own pertussis containing vaccine (given at 6-weeks and 4-months of age). Babies less than 6-months of age are at greatest risk of severe disease and death from pertussis.

COVID-19 vaccines

The administration of COVID-19 vaccines to pregnant women is not routinely recommended however it is not contraindicated. Currently, there is limited data available on the safety of COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy and on pregnancy outcomes. ATAGI recommends that immunisation during pregnancy could be considered if there are medical risk factors for developing severe disease or if there is a high risk of exposure to the virus (ie: occupational risk factors).

ATAGI recommends that women who are breastfeeding or who are planning pregnancy can receive COVID-19 vaccines. 

Contraindicated vaccines

All live-attenuated vaccines are contraindicated during pregnancy due to the potential risk to the unborn baby [see Table 1 below]. In most circumstances the risk is hypothetical however, there is insufficient evidence to support vaccination in this patient group. The limited safety data from inadvertent administration of live-attenuated viral vaccines such as the MMR and Varicella vaccines is reassuring.

Table 1: Live-attenuated vaccines contraindicated in pregnancy

Disease Brand name
Rotavirus Rotarix®, Rotateq®
MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) Priorix®, MMR II®
MMRV (measles-mumps-rubella-varicella) Priorix-tetra®, ProQuad®
Varicella (chickenpox) Varilrix®, Varivax®
Zoster (shingles) Zostavax®
Tuberculosis BCG (varying brands)
Yellow fever Stamaril®
Typhoid^ Vivotif®
Japanese encephalitis Imojev®

^Oral vaccine

Resources

Monash Health immunisation resources

MVEC resources

Authors: Michelle Giles (Infectious Diseases Consultant, Monash Health) and Rachael McGuire (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator)

Reviewed by: Rachael McGuire (MVEC Education Nurse Coordinator)

Date: February 2021

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.


Measles

What is it?

Measles is a highly contagious viral illness.

What to look for

Infection usually begins with 2-4 days of fever, malaise, cough, runny nose and conjunctivivits.

A macropapular rash then develops, often beginning on the face before becoming more generalised.

Complications of disease include pneumonia, encephalitis, brain damage, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and death.

Measles infections during pregnancy can result in miscarriage and prematurity.

How is it transmitted?

It is highly infective and spread by coughing and sneezing.

Prevention

Measles containing vaccines (measles-mumps-rubella or measles-mumps-rubella-varicella) can protect against disease. Currently on the National Immunisation Program, these are given at 12 months of age (MMR) and 18 months of age (MMRV).

For those born after 1966, 2 doses are required for lifelong protection. One or two doses of free MMR vaccine is available for all adults born during or since 1966 without evidence of receiving two documented doses of valid MMR vaccine or without serological evidence of immunity.

Travel

Infants aged from 6 months to less than 11 months can receive a free dose of MMR vaccine prior to overseas travel to highly endemic areas and during outbreaks. This dose is in addition to the scheduled MMR vaccine doses usually administered at ages 12 months (MMR) and 18 months (MMRV). Please discuss with your Doctor or travel specialist.

Post-exposure prophylaxis

If a non-immune individual is exposed to measles, immunisation with MMR or MMRV is recommended to occur within 72 hours of exposure in order to reduce the likelihood of infection (provided immunisation is not a contraindication).

In some instances, administration of Normal Human Immunoglobulin (NHIG) may be indicated [refer to resources].

Resources

Author: Rachael McGuire (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children's Research Institute)

Reviewed by: Rachael McGuire (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children's Research Institute)

Date: August 2020

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.


MMR vaccine and autism

Some families have concerns around the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and the diagnosis of autism. At MVEC we encourage parents to find the best available evidence to help them make a decision around vaccinating their child. The MMR live-attenuated vaccine is recommended on the National Immunisation Program at 12-months of age and combined with the varicella vaccine (MMRV) at 18-months of age.

A great resource for addressing MMR concerns is a decision aid developed by the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) in Sydney. It is targeted at:

  • Parents or caregivers of a child approaching their due date for MMR vaccination.
  • Anyone who would like more information about MMR vaccination

Note: this guide provides general information only, and is not intended as a substitute for consultations with qualified health professionals. For specific queries talk with your local doctor or immunisation provider, or contact us at info.mvec@mcri.edu.au or Telephone: 1300 882 924

Resource

Authors: Nigel Crawford (Director, SAEFVIC, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute) and Rachael McGuire (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute)

Reviewed by: Rachael McGuire (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute)

Date: July 2020

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family's personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.


Monash Health Immunisation Service

What is it?

The Monash Health Immunisation Service was established in 2012.

It is a nurse-led, all-age immunisation drop-in service, with adult and paediatric immunisation physician support and clinics. The service provides immunisation education and management for high risk groups including oncology, renal, diabetic, respiratory and cardiac, transplant, hyposplenic and asplenic patients. It provides opportunistic immunisation for inpatients and outpatients according to the National Immunisation Program (NIP), influenza vaccines, and antenatal immunisations.

Monash Immunisation Service provides assistance with complex immunisation issues, catch-up immunisation advice, immunisation adverse event management and supports an outpatient immunisation clinic. The service also has a dedicated BCG clinic for children aged 0-5 years (GP referral required).

Contact

Telephone: 1300 882 924 (option 4)

Pager: 4488 via switchboard 9594 6666

Email: immunisation@monashhealth.org

Facsimile: 03 9594 6325

Location

Suite I, Jessie McPherson Private Consulting Suite
Level 2, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton

Resources

Authors: Joanne Hickman (NUM Monash Immunisation, Monash Health), Jim Buttery (Paediatrician/ ID physician, Monash Health) and Rachael McGuire (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children's Research Institute)

Reviewed by: Joanne Hickman (ANUM Monash Immunisation, Monash Health) and Rachael McGuire (SAEFVIC Research Nurse, Murdoch Children's Research Institute)

Date: September 2020

Materials in this section are updated as new information and vaccines become available. The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre (MVEC) staff regularly reviews materials for accuracy.

You should not consider the information in this site to be specific, professional medical advice for your personal health or for your family’s personal health. For medical concerns, including decisions about vaccinations, medications and other treatments, you should always consult a healthcare professional.