Updated immunisation reference page: Vaccine-associated enhanced disease

MVEC has recently updated its reference page on vaccine-associated enhanced disease (VAED).

VAED is a rare phenomenon where a person who has been vaccinated experiences a more severe clinical presentation of an infection than would normally be seen in an unvaccinated person.

The new page includes more detailed information on VAED diagnosis, and vaccines that have been associated with VAED.

MVEC: Vaccine-associated enhanced diseased


New immunisation reference page: Specialist immunisation services

MVEC has recently published a new reference page with information about specialist immunisation services available in Victoria. 

Specialist immunisation services are hospital-based immunisation clinics led by a team of specialised medical and nursing staff with expertise in vaccines and immunisation. 

MVEC’s new page provides information about accessing the Victorian services.

MVEC: Specialist immunisation services 


更新免疫参考页:流感

Influenza virus can cause infections resulting in a spectrum of symptoms, from mild cough and cold features to systemic illnesses with multiple complications. Pregnant women, children under 5 years, those aged over 65 years, people with underlying medical conditions, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples carry the highest rates of morbidity and mortality within Australia. Annual vaccination is recommended for everyone aged 6 months and over.

MVEC has recently updated its influenza reference page to detail the recommendations for vaccination in 2024, including the influenza strains included in this year’s vaccines, the vaccine brands available by age and funding, and commonly asked questions.

MVEC:流感
(NB: translated versions of the updated influenza reference page will be available soon)


Updated immunisation reference page: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a virus that causes both upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Children under 1 year of age, individuals with underlying medical conditions (e.g. chronic cardiac and lung disease), the older population and immunocompromised people are more likely to experience serious disease requiring hospitalisation. 

MVEC has recently updated its RSV reference page to include information on the administration of Arexvy, the only RSV vaccine available in Australia. This vaccine is registered for use in all adults aged 60 years and over and is specifically recommended for certain populations. 

MVEC: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)


New immunisation reference page: Open disclosure

Open disclosure is an accreditation requirement of all health services under the National Safety and Quality Health Service (NSQHS) Standards.  Open disclosure should occur after any vaccine error, and includes a discussion with the affected person, or their families, carers or other support persons. Open disclosure can be challenging and complex. However, it can produce benefits such as improved transparency and communication between clinicians and patients; and opportunities for health services to improve care delivery systems and processes. 

MVEC has recently published a new immunisation reference page on Open disclosure.  

MVEC: Open disclosure 


Updated immunisation reference page: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of respiratory tract infections in young children. While for some it can cause the common cold, for others, it may lead to more severe infection. Children under 1 year of age, individuals with underlying medical conditions (e.g. chronic cardiac and lung disease), the older population and immunocompromised people are more likely to experience serious disease and hospitalisation.

MVEC has recently updated its RSV reference page to include information about the newly approved AREXVY vaccine and with more detail on RSV symptoms, epidemiology and prevention.

MVEC:呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)


Updated immunisation reference page: Injection site nodules

Injection site nodules (ISNs) are a rare adverse event following immunisation (AEFI). Nodules can occur following the administration of an injected vaccine. They are most often asymptomatic, but may be intermittently tender, itchy, or show overlying skin changes. They generally resolve on their own without intervention.

We have recently updated our ISN reference page. The updated page includes information on ISN diagnosis, possible causes, and treatment, and recommendations for future vaccine doses.

MVEC:注射部位结节


Updated immunisation reference page: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples immunisation recommendations

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, or First Nations Australians, have higher rates of some vaccine‑preventable diseases compared to non‑Indigenous Australians. First Nations Australians are prioritised for additional protection through the funding of additional vaccines on the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

We have recently updated our reference page on immunisation recommendations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The newly updated page includes:

  • a comprehensive table of funded vaccines available in each state
  • information about vaccine‑preventable diseases targeted through funding
  • information about vaccine access
  • links to helpful resources.

微血管内皮细胞: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people immunisation recommendations


更新免疫参考页:免疫抑制和疫苗

Individuals who are immunocompromised have a weakened immune system, resulting in a decreased ability to fight infections. Immunocompromise can be caused by many different factors such as certain medical conditions, being a transplant recipient, advancing age or taking medications that suppress the immune system.

Vaccination is particularly important for those who are immunocompromised, due to the increased risk of developing severe disease if exposed to vaccine-preventable diseases.

We have recently reviewed our reference page on immunocompromise/immunosuppression and vaccines. The page includes up-to-date information on vaccine timing, contraindicated vaccines and safe alternatives, what to do in the event of inadvertent administration of a live-attenuated vaccines, and advice for household contacts of immunocompromised people.

MVEC:免疫抑制和疫苗


Updated immunisation reference page: Injection site reactions

Injection site reactions (ISRs) are a common localised side effect that can occur following the administration of any injected vaccine.

We have recently updated our injection site reaction reference page to provide more information on the diagnosis of ISRs, to detail factors associated with a higher incidence of ISRs and to clarify the proper treatment of ISRs.

ISRs resolve on their own without intervention. They can be managed at home with symptomatic relief. ISRs are not a sign of allergy or local infection. Therefore antihistamines, steroids or antibiotics are not required.

MVEC:注射部位反应