New immunisation reference page: Open disclosure

Open disclosure is an accreditation requirement of all health services under the National Safety and Quality Health Service (NSQHS) Standards.  Open disclosure should occur after any vaccine error, and includes a discussion with the affected person, or their families, carers or other support persons. Open disclosure can be challenging and complex. However, it can produce benefits such as improved transparency and communication between clinicians and patients; and opportunities for health services to improve care delivery systems and processes. 

MVEC has recently published a new immunisation reference page on Open disclosure.  

MVEC: Open disclosure 


Updated immunisation reference page: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of respiratory tract infections in young children. While for some it can cause the common cold, for others, it may lead to more severe infection. Children under 1 year of age, individuals with underlying medical conditions (e.g. chronic cardiac and lung disease), the older population and immunocompromised people are more likely to experience serious disease and hospitalisation.

MVEC has recently updated its RSV reference page to include information about the newly approved AREXVY vaccine and with more detail on RSV symptoms, epidemiology and prevention.

MVEC: Virus hợp bào hô hấp (RSV)


Updated immunisation reference page: Injection site nodules

Injection site nodules (ISNs) are a rare adverse event following immunisation (AEFI). Nodules can occur following the administration of an injected vaccine. They are most often asymptomatic, but may be intermittently tender, itchy, or show overlying skin changes. They generally resolve on their own without intervention.

We have recently updated our ISN reference page. The updated page includes information on ISN diagnosis, possible causes, and treatment, and recommendations for future vaccine doses.

MVEC: Các nốt sần tại chỗ tiêm


Updated immunisation reference page: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples immunisation recommendations

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, or First Nations Australians, have higher rates of some vaccine‑preventable diseases compared to non‑Indigenous Australians. First Nations Australians are prioritised for additional protection through the funding of additional vaccines on the National Immunisation Program (NIP).

We have recently updated our reference page on immunisation recommendations for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The newly updated page includes:

  • a comprehensive table of funded vaccines available in each state
  • information about vaccine‑preventable diseases targeted through funding
  • information about vaccine access
  • links to helpful resources.

MEC: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people immunisation recommendations


Trang tham khảo tiêm chủng cập nhật: Thuốc ức chế miễn dịch và vắc xin

Individuals who are immunocompromised have a weakened immune system, resulting in a decreased ability to fight infections. Immunocompromise can be caused by many different factors such as certain medical conditions, being a transplant recipient, advancing age or taking medications that suppress the immune system.

Vaccination is particularly important for those who are immunocompromised, due to the increased risk of developing severe disease if exposed to vaccine-preventable diseases.

We have recently reviewed our reference page on immunocompromise/immunosuppression and vaccines. The page includes up-to-date information on vaccine timing, contraindicated vaccines and safe alternatives, what to do in the event of inadvertent administration of a live-attenuated vaccines, and advice for household contacts of immunocompromised people.

MVEC: Thuốc ức chế miễn dịch và vắc-xin


Updated immunisation reference page: Injection site reactions

Injection site reactions (ISRs) are a common localised side effect that can occur following the administration of any injected vaccine.

We have recently updated our injection site reaction reference page to provide more information on the diagnosis of ISRs, to detail factors associated with a higher incidence of ISRs and to clarify the proper treatment of ISRs.

ISRs resolve on their own without intervention. They can be managed at home with symptomatic relief. ISRs are not a sign of allergy or local infection. Therefore antihistamines, steroids or antibiotics are not required.

MVEC: Phản ứng tại chỗ tiêm


New immunisation reference page: DiGeorge syndrome and vaccines

DiGeorge syndrome (also known as velocardiofacial syndrome or 22q11.2 deletion syndrome) is a genetic condition that affects approximately 1 in 2,000 newborns.

The implications of DiGeorge syndrome vary between individuals. It is commonly associated with immunocompromise, making vaccination particularly important to provide protection against vaccine-preventable diseases.

MVEC has recently published a new immunisation reference page on DiGeorge syndrome, including a new guidance developed as a collaboration between MVEC, Queensland Children’s Hospital and Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital.

MVEC: DiGeorge syndrome and vaccines


New immunisation reference page: Immunosuppression in pregnancy and infant vaccine recommendations

Immunosuppressive therapies play an important role in the treatment of many medical conditions.

MVEC has recently published a new immunisation reference page on immunosuppression in pregnancy and infant vaccine recommendations. The page includes a new guidance, developed as a collaboration between MVEC, Queensland Children’s Hospital and Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital.

MVEC: Immunosuppression in pregnancy and infant vaccine recommendations


Translated versions of immunisation reference pages: Influenza and Tuberculosis (BCG)

We are excited to let you know that we are now offering translated versions of a couple of our most popular immunisation reference pages.

Của chúng tôi cúmtuberculosis/BCG reference pages are both available to read in Hindi, Simplified Chinese, and Vietnamese.

These two reference pages include information on disease symptoms, epidemiology, transmission and vaccine recommendations.

The pages are available via the banner on our homepage, links at the top of our A–Z reference page or by selecting the preferred language from a drop-down box on the reference page itself (MVEC: CúmMVEC: Tuberculosis/BCG).


Updated immunisation reference page: COVID‑19

We have updated our COVID-19 reference page with up-to-date guidance on currently available COVID-19 vaccines, across age groups.

The newly updated page includes recommendations on the use of the new monovalent XBB.1.5 vaccines and answers to commonly asked questions relating to the new vaccines as well as other COVID-19 vaccine-related queries. 

MVEC: COVID-19