RSV programs announced in NSW and Qld

New South Wales and Queensland have both announced respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) programs to provide protection for infants and children. 

In New South Wales, infants vulnerable to severe illness from RSV will be eligible to receive nirsevimab, a monoclonal antibody (available in Australia under the brand name Beyfortus). This includes: 

  • babies born before 37 weeks gestation and adter 31 October 2023 
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander babies born after 31 October 2023 
  • other infants living with specific chronic and complex health conditions. 

Read more on the NSW Health website. 

The Queensland program will also provide nirsevimab (brand name, Beyfortus) to eligible infants and young children, including: 

  • all newborn infants from birth 
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants up to < 8 months of age 
  • infants with certain complex medical conditions up to < 8 months of age 
  • young children with certain complex medical conditions from 8–19 months of age (until 31 October 2024). 

For more details, read about the new program on the Queensland Health website. 

MVEC: RSV


AusVaxSafety Summary report 2022 published

Since 2014, AusVaxSafety has monitored the safety of all vaccines on the National Immunisation Program (NIP) and all COVID-19 vaccines used in Australia.  

Surveillance is undertaken via a short vaccine safety survey which is sent to people (or their carers) who received their vaccine at a participating AusVaxSafety site across Australia. The surveys give participants the opportunity to report any adverse events following immunisation that they experienced and if they sought medical attention for any reason. 

The Vaccine safety in Australia AusVaxSafety Summary report 2022 is now available on the Department of Health and Aged Care website. 

MVEC: AusVaxSafety


NCIRS: New influenza resource

Các Trung tâm Nghiên cứu và Giám sát Tiêm chủng Quốc gia (NCIRS) has recently published a new Influenza reference page which includes influenza fact sheets and FAQs, vaccine coverage and safety data, and clinical/community resources.  

NCRIS: Influenza immunisation
MVEC: Cúm


Western Australia announces funding for RSV protection

Western Australia has announced that they will roll out a statewide program for long-acting monoclonal antibody Nirsevimab from April 2024. Nirsevimab (available in Australia under the brand name Beyfortus) is indicated for the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease in neonates and infants.  

Western Australian children eligible for Nirsevimab include: 

  • all infants from birth to under 8 months 
  • infants from 8 months to 19 months at increased risk of severe RSV. 

Nirsevimab will be available at birthing hospitals, GP practices, community health clinics and at Aboriginal Medical Services across Western Australia. 

There were approximately 128,000 confirmed RSV cases in Australia in 2023, including approximately 65,000 children aged 4 years and under. 

For more information, see MVEC: RSVWA Media Statement on RSV 


ATAGI: Statement on the administration of seasonal influenza vaccines in 2024

ATAGI (Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation) has published their recommendations for the use seasonal influenza vaccines in Australia in 2024. 

Influenza vaccines are recommended annually and are funded on the National Immunisation Program (NIP) for: 

  • children aged 6 months to less than 5 years 
  • all adults aged 65 years and older  
  • specific populations aged 5 to 64 years who are at greatest risk of developing complications from influenza infection (including phụ nữ có thai, Người bản địa, and those with certain medical risk factors). 

For more information refer to: ATAGI: Statement on the administration of seasonal influenza vaccines in 2024 


ATAGI: Statement on the administration of COVID-19 vaccines in 2024

MỘTTAGI haS released new advice relating to the administration of further COVID-19 vaccines. 

The need and frequency of further doses beyond a primary course depends on the age of the recipient and their level of immunocompromise:  

  • All individuals aged 75 years and over- recommended to receive a dose every 6 months 
  • All individuals aged 65 to 74 years- recommended to receive a dose every 12 months, but can consider a dose every 6 months 
  • Individuals with severe immunocompromise aged 18 to 64 years- recommended to receive a dose every 12 months, but can consider a dose every 6 months 
  • Individuals without severe immunocompromise aged 18 to 64- can consider a dose every 12 months 
  • Individuals with severe immunocompromise aged 5 to 17 years- can consider a dose every 12 months 
  • Individuals without severe immunocompromise aged 5 to 17 years- not recommended to receive further doses 
  • Individuals less than 5 years- not recommended to receive further doses. 

Omicron XBB1.5 vaccines are preferred for all primary and subsequent doses in all ages. There is currently no supply of the công ty Omicron XBB1.5 formulation for children aged 6 months- 4 years however it is anticipated to be available later in 2024. Until this time providers should continue using the age-appropriate Comirnaty original formulation for this group.  

For more information refer to: ATAGI statement on the administration of COVID-19 vaccines in 2024 


ATAGI: Statement on the clinical use of Arexvy

ATAGI (Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation) has published a statement on the clinical use of Arexvy, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine, for the prevention of RSV in older adults in Australia. 

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of respiratory tract infections in young children and is associated with severe respiratory disease in people aged over 60 years.   

Arexvy is available on the private market, and is recommended for: 

  • all adults aged over 75 years 
  • First Nations Australians aged 60 to 74 years 
  • Non-Indigenous Australians with medical conditions that increase their risk of severe disease due to RSV. 

ATAGI’s full statement includes further details on recommendations, contraindications, coadministration, RSV and Arexvy.

A new chapter on RSV will be available in the Australian Immunisation Handbook by mid-2024. Until then, use the ATAGI statement for clinical guidance. 

ATAGI: Statement on the clinical use of Arexvy

MVEC: RSV


CDC on RSV vaccine administration errors

The CDC reports that, in the United States, the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine Arexvy has been administered in error to some children and pregnant people. Arexvy is not approved for use in infants or young children, or pregnant people. Most of the reported administration errors occurred in outpatient settings (e.g. GP clinics and pharmacies). 

In January Arexvy was registered by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for use in Australia, for the immunisation of people aged 60 years and older to prevent lower respiratory tract disease caused by RSV. 

ATAGI (Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation) today (29 February 2024) published guidance on the clinical use of Arexvy.

CDC Clinical Outreach and Communication Activity: Information on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine administration errors in young children and pregnancy people


WHO: Nearly 10 000 children vaccinated as malaria vaccine rollout in Africa expands

Nearly 10,000 children in Burkina Faso and Cameroon have received the RTS,S malaria vaccine in recent weeks. The vaccine rollout in the two countries is a critical step forward in the fight against one of the leading causes of death in Africa. At least 28 African countries plan to introduce a malaria vaccine as part of their national immunisation programs.

There have been two malaria vaccines endorsed for use in Africa: RTS,S (available now) and R21 (expected to be available in mid 2024). Four doses are recommended for both vaccines; 3 by 9 months of age and the last dose at 18 months of age.

WHO: Nearly 10 000 children vaccinated as malaria vaccine rollout in Africa expands

Gavi: Vaccine profiles: malaria


The Guardian: Brazil starts mass vaccination amid upsurge in dengue fever

Brazil has become the first country to roll out a national dengue vaccination program, in response to a surge of dengue fever cases across the country. The country's health ministry said nearly 365,000 dengue cases were reported in the first five weeks of 2024, four times the number during the same period in 2023.

Brazil has purchased 5.2m doses of the dengue vaccine Qdenga and is commencing vaccination of children aged 10 to 14 years.

Dengue is a viral infection, spread by mosquitoes to people. Since the beginning of 2023, there have been more than five million cases globally and more than 5,000 dengue-related deaths reported.

The Guardian: Brazil starts mass vaccination amid upsurge in dengue fever

WHO: Disease outbreak news: Dengue